Coronavirus News Update: Top Cause of Death

Diagnose-checking-coronavirus-or-covid-19-testing-…ith-virtual-screen-in-laboratory | Coronavirus News Update: Top Cause of Death | feature
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It has been a rough year for everyone – balancing work and staying safe. Many things have changed since the first appearance of coronavirus, and now Covid-19 has become the third-leading cause of death in the U.S. last year. Read about this week’s coronavirus news update to know all the statistics.

RELATED: CORONAVIRUS NEWS UPDATE: MONTHS AWAY FROM A SAFER TIME, BUT DON’T LET YOUR GUARD DOWN

 

In This Article:

  1. Coronavirus News: Quick Overview 
  2. Statistics
  3. Conclusion

 

Coronavirus News: The Demand for Vaccines Is Higher than Ever

Coronavirus News: Quick Overview

According to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Covid became the third-leading cause of death in the U.S. last year. And it is only behind two other causes, including cancer and heart disease.

What’s more, this pandemic has caused the death rate in the U.S. to accelerate at a worrying speed. In a news briefing on Wednesday, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, the CDC Director, said in the United States, nearly 3.3 million people died in 2020. Overall, this reflects a 16% rise in deaths compared to 2019. The Covid-19 pandemic caused roughly about 11 percent of the deaths in 2020.

RELATED: CORONAVIRUS NEWS UPDATE: WHAT ARE CHALLENGE TRIALS AND ARE THEY NECESSARY?

 

Statistics

An-asian-woman-in-a-protective-suit-and-mask-holds…or-Vaccines-Is-Higher-than-Ever | Coronavirus News Update: Top Cause of Death | Statistics

The CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics produced the study based on death certificate data from January to December. According to the survey, heart disease, which has long been America’s leading cause of death, was responsible for nearly 690,000 deaths last year. Cancer was responsible for almost 598,000 deaths.

In 2020, Covid-19 was identified as a cause of death or contributing cause on nearly 375,000 death certificates. (As of Wednesday, the figure had risen to over 540,000.) Covid-19 was identified as the sole cause of death by a limited proportion of those polled, while Covid-19 was listed among other health issues by more than 97 percent.

However, doctors believe such deaths would not have happened if Covid-19 had not exacerbated the victims’ pre-existing conditions.

Last year, a similar report from the CDC led to concerns that COVID-19 was not the actual cause for those casualties in the majority of cases. It’s also been established that underlying diseases like kidney disease, high cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, obesity, and Type 2 diabetes can put people at even high risk for death from COVID-19.

Recently, CDC published a study that found that almost 80 percent of the hospitalized patients with COVID-19 in the U.S. were classified as either obese or overweight. The latest CDC study has stated that Covid-19 induced a “possible chain-of-events syndrome,” which means that the infection directly caused other complications described on the death certificate, such as pneumonia or respiratory failure.

 

Conclusion

Medicine-doctor-with-stethoscope-holding-corona-vi…und | Coronavirus News Update: Top Cause of Death | Conclusion

In general, 70 to 80 percent of death certificates had both a chain-of-event condition and a primary contributing condition, or a chain-of-event condition only. Furthermore, the actual number of Covid-19 deaths may be even more significant. Due to the limited availability of testing, the number of Covid-19–related deaths may have been underestimated.

 

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